Tag Archives: faith

Faith as Love

If, as James tells us, “Faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead” (James 2:17) then it must be remembered by the disciple of Christ that faith, in its purest form, is an act of love. After all, “saved by faith, through grace, and not of our works lest any man should boast” (Ephesians 2:8-9), what is our redemption and the sacrifices that give it its power but an act of love strengthening and preserving us even unto life everlasting?

Considered rightly, in accordance with the teachings of our blessed Savior that admonishes us to love one another to show our life given to Him (John 13:34-35), the two are intrinsically bound together. In this what it offers to us is an understanding that teaches us that without love there can be no faith.

In this relationship love is more than a feeling. It is act, a commitment, a sense of duty that only really and truly exists through actions, through thought and deed that strive towards the individual call to do more with the gifts that have been given to us by the blessings of our Creator. It is the hope that we offer in the lives of others, hearing the words of Christ, living by His example, each and every step of the way seeking to uplift and edify others according to their needs as we hear the call to service.

You see every one of us, we have something to offer. The God who fearfully and wonderfully created us did so that our lives could and would be in service, offering to us strengths, talents and abilities that are meant to be used. (Luke 12:48) The question then for the disciple, living amidst a world where there is so much need, is what will I do to meet it? If our faith lives within us then, in love, we must ask ourselves what will I do to ensure the betterment of others?

Perhaps, in a busy and hectic life, we think to ourselves that we just don’t have the time. After all there is so much that could be done that to worry about it, to try and take it on, would be overwhelming. Yet the truth is that hope and love, it begins one life at a time. We don’t need to take on the world. If each disciple took it upon themselves to take up one cause, to effect change in one life that is in need, working to truly help one person before moving on to the next, true and lasting change could be made to significantly help others. All it takes is a little sacrifice on our part.

Consider, for a moment, the life of Christ, the one whose example we, in our faith, are to live by. (1 Corinthians 11:1) There was never a time He took on more than He could handle. Most of time He healed one or two at a time, He worked on the individual spirits and souls, body and minds before that great, encompassing sacrifice that saved us all. For us it serves as a lesson that teaches us that no person is expected to do more than they can, but they are expected to live according to a love that heals, that strengthens, and that calls others through the love that they have.

Look around, consider the lives of those who surround you and the need that is there. Give of your time and yourself to those who are struggling and find themselves in desperation. Be the disciple that God knows you can be, the disciple that He calls you to be. Take the time each day to consider the world around you, to think of those in your life who are struggling and how you can help them. Look for causes, worthy causes, that you can donate to, volunteer with, and help those who live in a constant battle find some sort of sense in their life.

In faith, our lives can be given to love that the blessings we have been endowed with can bring happiness, joy and strength to others. This can be our testimony that shines forth from hearts and souls if we are so inclined to hear the calling of Christ. The only question then left to ask is what sort of disciple will you be and how will your life offer of the love that saved you?

Judging

There are few greater controversies for the disciple than the question of judging others and the proper nature of it. After all, to read the words of Scripture, to read the words of our blessed Savior himself, we come to understand that there is an inherent evil that can come with the application of our judgment as we assess the nature of sin and apply to it our own understanding.

Does this mean though that we do not judge? What do passages such as “Let any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her…” (John 8:7), “Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye?” (Matthew 7:3) or the ever popular “Do not judge or you too will be judge…” (John 7:1) truly inform us of in our walk with Christ? What do they teach us of the true nature of discipleship and the way we observe others?

As with all things the truest measure of our judgment and the nature of our faith must be tempered with love. It must be met with a generous spirit given to hope and the edification of others, bearing the fruits of faith to nourish and strength the lives of others. The controversy itself was never meant to steer us away from assessing and evaluating the actions of others. It was meant to ensure that we look to ourselves, that we understand ourselves so that, in all that we do, we act in steadfast devotion to our brothers and sisters, not out of condemnation but out of affection for them.

You see, of the two greatest commandments given by Christ himself, the second is to love our neighbor, to love our fellow man, as we love ourselves. (Matthew 22:36-40) What this means is that we must not be like the Pharisee, the hypocrite who deems himself righteous without a careful examination of himself, while condemning those around us for wickedness. (Luke 18:9-14) Our lives, they have to be given to a close and studious scrutiny as we daily inspect our own walks with our Savior as we are given to the Spirit of the Lord. With this this though also comes the understanding that we must hold others to the same level of accountability as we hold ourselves.

What we must remember is that, if given in the right spirit, if shown with the right heart, there is nothing more loving than to look at others, and to help them get back on the right path. If done with in faith, and charity, guided by a hope for them, it is done in a manner that does not seek to judge but that wants nothing more than to ensure that they are right with God even as we try to ensure that we are right with Him ourselves.

In hope and love for others this never comes in the form of an attack, nor should it be intended as a condemnation. The thought of stoning others, of casting them away, despising them for whatever offense they may have caused should never cross our mind. There is, after all, no means of spiritual death that we can heap upon the lives of others quite like the hurt and the sorrow we can bring with harsh words on our lips, haughtiness in our hearts and hatred in our eyes.

As a faithful and devoted disciple of Christ, given in a life of service, we cannot falter in our love for others, in our hopes for them, just as we hope for ourselves. Look to your life as a means not to judge others but to equip them for the righteous path, to nourish them for the long road through this world. This, at times, means helping them understand errors so that they can learn from them. Yet any help offered must be given in a clean heart and a right spirit that you may serve them for their greatest growth in a testimony to God’s love for them.

When this is done, when this is our nature, there is no controversy, there is no challenge, there is only the strength we can find in unity with others, rather than the pain that comes in the division of scorn.

A Public Display


There is a warning from our blessed Savior that all of His faithful disciples must heed lest they fall into the trap of arrogance, pride and self-righteousness. It is the cautionary counsel that informs the spiritually aware not to make their faith into a show, or a matter of theater for others to see. (Matthew 6:5-18) What is done in secret, He admonishes, is done for God to take notice of, it need not be seen by others.

Yet what does that really mean? What does it mean and what effect is it meant to have on the life of the faithful and the devoted given in a life to Christ?

Every now and then when faith is displayed for the world to see, that question seems to arise as those words of Christ as quoted. We see it even today amidst our society as the public displays of devotion of some are shunned and sought to be ushered away, making it almost sound as if that humility before the God of our creation is something shameful. How then do we answer that question in a spiritually aware way, and how do we reconcile the proper degree of piety with the marvels of the wonders of God’s blessings we want nothing more than to show the world?

As with all the teachings handed to us by the Divine Word of our Lord, we must allow for Scripture not only to guide us, but to interpret itself for us. There is nothing hypocritical, nor is there any degree of arrogance in displaying your faith for the world to see. In fact, without the works we do, meant to be given in love to others as a sign of devotion to Christ, (John 13:34-36), our faith stagnates and dies. (James 2:14-26) Grafted to the tree of life, our spirits, given to God, are meant to bear fruits. These are meant to be seen, they are meant to be gifts from us to others that we may edify and nourish the whole being of those around us in need.

So clear is Christ on this matter that the next verses (Matthew 6:19-24) warn of us of storing our treasures, of hoarding them deep from sight. What greater treasure have we than the faith that saves us in the redemption that it offers unto us?

At the core of Christ’s teaching is not to hide our faith away, as if it would be sinful for us to display it. If it were there would be no greater hypocrite and sinner than the perfect Son of God whose blameless life made way our path on high. What our Savior tried to demonstrate was a lesson about the self-righteous judging of others based on faith. It meant to teach us a deeper lesson about how we must look at ourselves and look at others, never elevating ourselves above them, living a life devoid of love while claiming to understand the heart and mind of our God.

In humility we are meant to live in service to one another, caring for each other as we care for ourselves and our own spiritual growth, and wellbeing. This cannot be done by locking our faith away from sight, just as surely as it cannot be done with judgmental eyes and scornful tongues.

As a faithful disciple of Christ show your faith, not as a point of pride but as the sign of your humility before a God who calls on you to live a life in service to others, to strengthen and edify those around you. Remember the world will always judge you for it by a different standard than it judges itself, but you are not given over to those assessments. No, by the power of the Spirit, you are given to grace in faith to a loving God who has set the example before you in His beloved Son given for you and your salvation. Our God gives us an armor that is meant for the righteous battles for faith, and like any armor it cannot be hidden away unless it is not worn, and that is when the truly devastating wounds pierce us.

Be not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ, for it is the power of salvation (Romans 1:16) and let none tell you it is shameful to carry forward into this world, for it is the strength of endurance, and the hope of our love in the wonders of God’s Spirit through us.

Sola Fide

Romans 3:28  For we hold that one is justified by faith apart from works of the law.

There was, even in the time of the first century church, controversy surrounding the subject of whether one is justified through faith alone or whether that is not sufficient on its own.  Many Christians of Jewish heritage believed that one must first become a Jew (come under the Jewish laws) before becoming a legitimate Christian.  Today we have similar sects within the church that believe justification comes though a combination of faith and works.

There is no biblical support for this view.  To the contrary, the Bible tells us that Jesus died once and for all (Romans 6:10).  To add requirements for salvation is to cheapen the cross.  James’ argument in the New Testament (James 2:14-26) is not that works are a requirement for salvation but rather that salvation through faith in Christ results in good works.

The bad news is that there is nothing you or I can do to get into a right relationship with God.  The good news is that because of Christ Jesus we don’t have to earn our way into God’s favor.  Justification is found through faith in Christ alone.  This is a wondrous, glorious truth.  God loves us so much that He sent His Son because He knew that otherwise we could never be good enough (Romans 5:8). We just need to put our faith in Him.  What an awesome God we serve!