Tag Archives: fellowship

The Word of Life

1 John 1:1-4  That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we looked upon and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life— the life was made manifest, and we have seen it, and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life, which was with the Father and was made manifest to us— that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you too may have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ. And we are writing these things so that our joy may be complete.

The natural response to the joy we receive in Christ is to share it.  How could we, knowing that we have experienced new life in the Son of God, keep that to ourselves?  We should be overflowing with joy, ready to burst if we don’t share it.

John was among the apostles who walked with Jesus while He was here on this earth.  He writes in his first letter to the churches in Asia Minor that he wants them to share in the fellowship he and others have with God through Christ.  He proclaims all he witnessed with his own eyes, all he heard with his own ears, so that the joy of others might be made full.  He’s not willing to keep it all to himself.  What he was sharing was life.

Jesus is the Word of life and He made Himself known to mankind.  John was there when Jesus was present in the flesh, God incarnate sharing life with other people.  John knew that real life is in Jesus and in this he found his joy.  He also knew that his joy would be made all the more complete if he told others about the Word.  Notice his motive explained in verse 4, that “our” joy may be made complete.

Jesus is life.  If you’ve experience new life in Him, share it with everyone around you, so that they will have joy AND so that your joy would be made more complete.  If you haven’t experienced the life-giver, why not seek Him out?  Find out what this life is that others are talking about.  Ask God to reveal Jesus to you and make Him real to you.  He will.

Guided by Love to Unity

What sort of Christian, what sort of Disciple do we want to be? How do we want our faith and our hope in Christ to be expressed? How do we want it seen by the world around us, reflected from the deeper places in our hearts and our souls?

Those should be, when we stop to think about it, relatively easy questions to answer, shouldn’t they? After all, the Word of God, simple and beautiful by its very nature, is uncomplicated when it offers us the understanding we need to dwell in the knowledge of what it means to be one of Christ’s Disciples, to follow in the footsteps and the path of our blessed Savior. (1 Corinthians 1:11) Of all the commands that came before, the instructions and the laws that wove around the most ancient of covenants, His was unadorned by ritual and ceremony, by pomp and procedure. Make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Triune God, (Matthew 28:16-20) showing them the path of faith and hope through a love that edifies, strengthens and nourishes those around us in the miracle that is His blessings. (John 13:34-35)

This is why He Himself, a poor carpenter from Galilee, born in the most meager of estates in Bethlehem, was viewed as so much of a threat. It didn’t matter who you were or where you came from or where you had been, you were welcomed to Him. Yes, what God wanted, what God expected was important, but, in a wisdom that so often seems to elude the comprehension of men, He knew there was no rules that meant more to God than that we love Him, and that we love our one another with the full strength and full conviction of our hearts and our souls, our spirits and our minds. (Matthew 22:37-41) This was the blessing we could be by which all abundant life shined as a beacon to the world around us.

So often though we get tend to get bogged down by doctrine and the fights that it brings, we get so hung up on one or two passages in Scripture that we tend to let that define our faith more than anything else. We let ourselves become known for the things we are against as we let it serve as a wall surrounding us that keeps others out, rather than letting our faith and love serve as a door to let them in.

Now, to be clear, a proper understanding of Scripture should never be debased, nor should it be shied away from. The Word of God is meant to be studied, to be learned from, as it offers a path through its instruction to a righteous life. (2 Timothy 3:16) Yet nowhere in the Bible does it say “He who believes and is baptized, believing in all the right doctrine shall be saved.” Why? Because God transcends us in His wisdom and His hope for us even as He knows we aren’t going to completely understand or grasp it, telling us to dwell in unity with one another and turn from those who would tear us apart, who would destroy the fabric of harmony and peace between us. (Romans 16:17-18)

After all, in the end, it’s only God Himself who judges the hearts, the words and the deeds, the lifestyles and the choices of those souls that enter His Kingdom, not us. The path, if we believe the words of our blessed Savior, the Good Shepherd who guides and protects us, it is not a path that is paved through strictest adherence that abides in law, it is the path that has been paved by Him (John 14:6) in His tender mercy, His loving care, and His healing touch.

You can do more as a Disciple in the humble works of faith with a kindness to others, seeking to be a blessing in the world around you than you could ever do by hiding, locked away in a fortress of law and doctrine, shunning the world harshly for the offenses that it causes you. In that you have the capacity, through the power of the Spirit, to do more with the gift of grace that God has given you if you let yourself. It’s just a question of if you’ll let yourself, knowing that God will use you for more if your heart is truly open to love, hope and charity, and the wonders they can bring.

So again, what sort of Disciple do you want to be? What sort of blessings do you want to bring through your faith? It can be a blessing blossoming with the radiance of the truest beauty that springs forth from your soul, it’s just a matter of setting aside your pride and letting the Spirit nurture it to that point. After all, it is this love, this hope, in the principles of Christ’s blessed example that makes Scripture relevant, passing from age to age even to the present one.

Devoted to fellowship

A disciple

1 John 1:3  that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you too may have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ.

What’s the difference between social interaction with someone and fellowship with them?  The answer is spiritual.  Fellowship is a spiritual connection between people that goes far beyond the social aspect.  God is in the mix.

Those who seek after God’s will and truly want to follow after Christ as His disciples have to have a heart for discipleship.  You can’t love God without loving other people.  Our true fellowship is with God the Father through His Son because of His sacrificial atonement on the cross.  We’d have no way to God the Father if it weren’t for Jesus.  And our fellowship with God spills out into our relationships with other people.

Bottom line principle is that lack of fellowship with God equals a lack of true fellowship with people.  We have to be spiritually connected to the Lord in order to have any deep interaction with fellow people.  We have to put Him first and cultivate our relationship with Him or our other relationships will suffer.  Our character, our attitude, our love, all are affected by our fellowship (or lack thereof) with God.

The role of obedience in fellowship

Fellowship

John 15:10  If you keep my commandments, you will abide in my love, just as I have kept my Father’s commandments and abide in his love.

In order to remain in fellowship with God, we must “abide” in Him, but how do we do this?  If we speak to God in prayer and hear from God in His Word, what do we do with we’ve said and heard?  How do we walk in this fellowship?

Sin separates us from God.  Any sin.  But it’s not about the wrong acts of sin, it’s about the broken relationship.  A perfect, holy God can’t tolerate sin and still be in fellowship with the sinner.  We have to be righteous, just as He is righteous (Matthew 5:48).  But a problem exists.  We’re not perfect and we can’t be!  So we come back to the question of how we can be in fellowship with God if the requirement is perfection.

First of all, just as sin is a broken relationship with God rather than wrong acts, righteousness is a right relationship with God rather than good acts.  We may not be capable of perfection, but we have been given the righteousness of Christ, who is perfect, if our lives are submitted to Him.  Only then do we have any ability to obey God.  You see, obeying doesn’t lead to righteousness.  Imputed righteousness (look that up, it’s a great word study) empowers us to obey.  Jesus’ work on the cross frees us that we might be able to obey God, because we love Him.  Obedience based on love can only lead to loving fellowship.

Prayer as a means to fellowship

Fellowship

John 16:24 Until now you have asked nothing in my name. Ask, and you will receive, that your joy may be full.

How do we connect with God?  We hear from Him in the Bible, learn who He is and what His will is, and gain fellowship with Him.  But what about our side of the conversation?  How does God hear from us?

Prayer is our way of speaking to the Lord and a big part of fellowship with Him.  We mainly pray in one of several fashions.  Confession is where we own up to our sins before God and receive the forgiveness He’s given in Christ.  Petition is the time to ask for our needs to be met (“Give us this day our daily bread”), while intercession is asking for the needs of others to be met.  Thanksgiving and praise are vital to fellowship as well.  Giving thanks to God for all He’s done puts our hearts in a humble place where we’re more capable of experiencing Him and praising Him.

Without prayer, fellowship with God falters because we can’t even carry on a human relationship without speaking to the other person, let alone a close relationship with the Creator of all things.  We wants our attention, our time, our devotion.  Talking the time to speak to God serves a key role in our spiritual well-being.