Tag Archives: patience

The fruit of the Spirit – Patience

Galatians 5:22 But the fruit of the spirit is…patience

Patience is never a subject that Christians want to hear a message about. We’ve all experienced praying for patience, only to have the worst day ever. This may be where the saying “Be careful what you wish for” came from. It seems that when we pray for patience, the Lord gives us some training.

But we should all strive to show patience, so that others may see that something different in us. We must be the ones in the frustrating situation who are keeping a cool head. This is an open door to witnessing to nonbelievers. When we keep our cool, even though everyone around us is losing theirs, people may ask us how it’s so. We must walk through that open door.

If we are to bear fruit as a witness to our Savior, we must have patience to deal with all things that come our way. If we do not have patience with nonbelievers, we will not show them love. If we do not have patience, we will not show kindness in a world that lacks it. Without patience, there is no self-control, and so on and so forth.

To bear any fruit of the spirit, we must exercise patience.

Love is patient

1 Corinthians 13:4a Love is patient…

When you think about words that describe love, patience may not be among the first to come to mind.  It’s true that one of the things usually not portrayed as “love” in society is a patience for others.  Patience means that we are, as James tells us to be, “quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger” (James 1:19).  That doesn’t happen naturally.

For most of us, the instinctive way to act is to be quick to give our thoughts on something.  This logically means that we’re not putting listening first.  When we put ourselves before others by not listening, we’re devaluing them and in turn the relationship.  True love waits.  Sometimes this means listening first.

Or, more often maybe, that means putting up with something for the sake of our relationships.  When someone does something that rattles us, how we react makes the difference in whether or not we’re acting in love.  Quick, sharp words are most often hurtful.  Loving, thought-out words spoken with patience will do more than win an argument.  They’ll show the other person that we value them and care about how we make them feel.

True love takes effort, and patience.

Want and Need

What we want isn’t always what we need and what we need isn’t always what we want. That is perhaps one of the most difficult lessons that God teaches us in our lives as we struggle with purpose and meaning, searching for a reason, wondering to ourselves if He is even listening. Sometimes we just, well we have this image in our head of the way things should be or ought to be and it becomes such a prevalent thought that we can’t picture it any other way. Other times it’s that we look around and we can’t seem to understand why it is the way it is when we know it should be different, even if we don’t necessarily know how or why that should be the case.

It’s the question of divine purpose that so often gets to us, that so often weighs us down as we know what we want or how we want it, and yet, as we do, we have a hard time reconciling it to what God knows that we need in our lives. The thing about it is that we’re not even trying to be that terribly difficult, we aren’t trying to make it that much harder, we just want to know why it is the way that it is, we want to know what the plan and the design of it is, and we don’t necessarily get why it has to be the way that it is.

The deepest questions of who we are, and who we need to be, of where we need to be, they aren’t ever questions that come simply or easily. We don’t just become people, we grow into them. Perhaps, along the way or path is changed or altered, it might be that it we are affected, even shaped by the interactions we have with others, sometimes our road is hard, sometimes it is easy, but any way that you look at it, it doesn’t just happen overnight where, one day, we are suddenly who we are at this very moment in our lives. So why would it be any different with a God who knows how we grow, how we evolve as a person, how we learn and we change with time? Why would He make the answers clear to us in a way that He knows would be unclear because it was given without any thought or consideration to who we are and how we became that person?

What God promises us isn’t an easy path, nor a simple one in any way but to our salvation through Christ Jesus. (Romans 5:8) What He does promise is that, through the fires and the floods, through the dangers and the perils, He will be there for us and with us, (Isaiah 43:2) never leaving us or abandoning us. (Joshua 1:5) What He tells us is that what we need, in those times when we question the purpose and the plan of it is all, is trust and patience, because those who trust in the Lord will find His goodness (2 Samuel 7:8) and those who are patient with Him will find their strength and purpose, uplifted in His love. (Isaiah 40:31) This is the wondrous miracle of His hand in our lives even as we find ourselves questioning where He is when we want the most.

Remember, it is not our wanting that exalts us, it is God, our Heavenly Father, and God alone who does that. (Psalm 46:10) It could be, at that moment, we don’t quite get how He is exalting us, but it’s only when we put those feelings behind us, when we let go of them, in the blessings of His hope that He lets us be of one mind with Him, (Romans 15:5) to see as He sees, making more and more apparent the glorious nature of the lessons He is teaching us to become as we need to be as He makes all things possible to us through the power of His grace made perfect in Christ through us. (Philippians 4:13)

Take a moment today, and look at your life, look at what you are struggling with, what is challenging you. Take the time to look at what you have laid at God’s feet, the burdens you still feel weighing on you, and instead of mistaking want for need and putting what you want out there, say to God, “Lord, show me as You will, teach me as You must so I can be as You intend for me to be.” Let go not just of the struggles but of the wants and the desires you have in them, and make it about what the Lord, your blessed Father, intends for you and let Him, in trust, patience and hope, guide you to where you must be.

It is only then that you will find the true path to the peace you are seeking, the only way you will find the true reconciliation of your will with God’s to the glorious ends of the love He has for you as He makes it about you rather than you making it about yourself.

Lessons of Faith (Two): Patience


As we are instructed through faith, so we ought to live. After all, there is no lesson in our lives that that can’t be taught to us if we take the time to understand the deeper meaning that the gift of grace that has been given to us through the power of the Spirit and the hold that it has on each of us.

It begins with trust, a trust that comes through letting go and letting God lead us. In a sense, it is both simple and yet hard for us to do. After all, when we are called to the new life that comes through the redemption of Christ, we come to put our hope in our Heavenly Father through the precious blood of the Lamb. Yet, for as much as we may rest on that blessed eternity, it’s the hardest thing for us to let go of our daily lives as we find ourselves faced with challenges: toiling, worrying, struggling as we reach towards who we want to be, who we need to be, knowing we have the capacity to do it but finding that it is just out of our reach.

Only when we remember that our God is the Lord of the great and the small, and put it all in His hand — that’s when we realize the fullness of our potential. But then, for as much as we need to trust, it is nothing if we do not heed the second great lesson of faith that comes to bear in our lives and our plans. This is patience.

Patience is perhaps the biggest stumbling block to trust, isn’t it? A fruit of faith, (Galatians 5:22-23) we know, we understand that it’s important, yet it is the difference between the head and the heart. But then life is short, something we are often times so painfully aware of. (Psalm 89:47) We want what we want right now, because we don’t want to waste the preciousness of that wondrous gift God has given us when He breathed life into us.

What we often times forget is that we aren’t always ready, we aren’t always prepared for everything. Like the Prodigal (Luke 11:15-32) we are so eager to go out and see everything, to feel everything. Perhaps our ambitions and our view of the wider world isn’t as selfish or as self centered as his was. It could be that we want it because we know all the good we can do, all the good that is possible for us and from us if we are just given the chance to be more. Yet when we allow for our impatience to take over, we go out unprepared for what the world has to offer and the resistance it may possibly put up against us.

Remember that God not only tells us, but He warns us as well that there is a time for everything (Ecclesiastes 3:1-8) if we are wise enough to be patient in it. God gives to us, He is gracious on to us, and the promise of His love is the same promise He makes over and over to you: He will not fail you or forsake you (Joshua 1:5) as He shows that His time is perfect if we rest it in His hands. (Psalm 31:15) Just because we want it right now doesn’t mean an unchanging God, a God who, in that nature, protects us from all we are not ready or prepared for, (Malachi 3:6) is suddenly going to change.

Faith involves patience just as assuredly as it involves trust. After all, the saints who rested in blessed faith did so patiently waiting for the hour of the Savior’s arrival that the blemishes of their sins might be washed away. They were saved because they looked, and they waited to the appointed hour of God’s anointed one. Even now, in faith, we wait for the second coming of that same Savior that will usher in the final hours of the Lord. If we can wait patiently, if we can look towards these things, trusting in God as we do, knowing the greater importance that they have in our lives, for our spirits and our souls, then why can’t we let go and be patient with Him, trusting in the promises that He has made to us?

Your time and your hour is coming if you just realize it is going to happen when God is ready for it to happen, Then the fullness of His design, the wonders of His plan will be revealed to you in the most significant of ways. He isn’t going to leave you without enough time to do what He intends for you to do even if time is short and our days our numbered. It’s just a matter of having faith in that, learning what it is that He is trying to teach you so you can be who you need to be. When that does happen you will see your faith is rewarded in the most significant of blessings and the most wondrous of miracles.

Be strong, dear disciples; be strong and be courageous, but most importantly be patient. Your hour is near. Just let God show it to you.

May This Cup

Knowing His inevitable end, the pain, the suffering, and the pain that would come in the form of His sacrifice;  stricken, smitten and afflicted (Isaiah 53:4), Christ waited patiently for the appointed hour in which the prophesies would be fulfilled.

The truth is, it had to be hard for Him, and we are given a brief look into the mindset of the Blessed Savior as He prayed to His Heavenly Father, pleading “My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken from me. Yet not as I will, but as you will.” (Matthew 26:39) He knew it wasn’t. After all,  His entire purpose would be fulfilled in the stations of the cross. Had God found a way for “this cup” to be taken from Him then there would have been no reason for Him to have been made man, no real point to His ministry. Anything and everything He was could have easily be fulfilled through the Prophets who came and went before Him.

Yet perfect God and perfect man, there was a nature to Christ that was much like our nature. How could there not when, to be our substitute, He had to be as we are?

Still, as disciples of Christ, given to His teachings, do we have those moments when we pray for whatever it is that we are facing to be lifted from us, to be taken from us? And when we do, how often do we put that last statement in, “Not as I will, but as you will”? When God does not take “this cup” from us, do we then associate it with Him not hearing us or being carefully absent from us? Or do we see it as something different altogether?

You see, though no suffering, no pain comes from God, from our loving Heavenly Father, it does not exclude the possibility and the fact that, in a sinful world so far from the nature that God has intended for us, suffering does exist. In promising to hear our prayers (Psalm 34:15) God does not promise to end every trial that we face. What He promises is that it will never be more than we can take or that we can handle. (1 Corinthians 10:13) Through His blessings He gives us the strength to endure (Philippians 4:13) as He makes us more than conquerors. (Romans 8:37)

The truth is, God is never absent from our lives, whatever it may be that we are forced to face, whatever struggles we may find that we have to endure. Yes, we can pray that they are removed from us, that the burden of them, the pain that they may bring, is something that we no longer have to shoulder. But God does not guarantee to remove it from us because it is perhaps something that we are meant to go through in order to get where we are going, to become the person that God intended for us to be.

This is, at times, hard for us to understand but the struggles that we have to face are not won by being removed from us. They are won through perseverance and hope in the knowledge that everything serves a purpose according to God’s love for His children and the strength we are given through the power of the Spirit. (Romans 5:3-5)

Consider for a moment whatever struggles you may face, whatever challenges that are there in front of you, consider how you pray and have faith in God during these times. Now consider the struggles of Christ and the prayer He offered to His Heavenly Father, the trust He had that even during the greatest of trials and the most enduring of tribulations there was a divine purpose in it all. Yes, pray according to hope, but more importantly pray according to God’s will and God’s plan for your life, understanding that it is greater than anything you could have known or thought, even when the times are tough and the struggles are before you.

Patience, strength and courage through the most difficult of times, the understanding that sacrifices must be made in our lives, even when they are hard to understand — these are the lessons of our blessed Savior during this Easter Season. The question then is, how will your faith guide you when it seems as if it is just too much to endure? Will you pray for God’s will for you or will you demand for your will to be done by God?