Tag Archives: serve

Serve others unselfishly

TETRRF-00005979-001Mark 10:45 For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.

 

 

 

Here’s a basic principle for remaining healthy: eat the right stuff, don’t eat too much, and exercise. That same concept can be applied to spiritual health as well. Study God’s Word, but don’t just sit around studying, put it into action. Serving others is spiritual exercise.

Someone once told me early on in my Christian life that it was time for me to stop just reading all the time and put the Word into practice. I was afraid to do it, worried that I was unqualified because I still had so much to learn. But he was right, if I was ever going to start living the way God wanted me to live, I’d have to walk out of my room and start serving other people.

Let’s look to our example of how to love and serve: Jesus. If anyone ever had a right to be served by everyone else, it was Jesus. Despite the fact that He simply could have ordered everyone to bow down to Him as their King, He chose instead to become servant to all. He didn’t come to earth to be served, but to give His own life.

Now, what’s holding us back from giving unselfishly for the sake of others knowing Him?

The Disciples Paradox of Hate and Love

The price of discipleship seems as if it would be a high one, doesn’t it? After all, it was our blessed Savior, Christ Jesus, who admonished, “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father and mother, his wife and children, his brothers and sisters–yes, even his own life–he cannot be my disciple.” (Luke 14:26) In a sense it almost seems contradictory to the nature of God, who is love, who taught us, for example, to honor our mother and our father, (Exodus 20:12) and who tells us that to live in hate is to live in death, devoid of the His grace. (1John 2:9-11)

How do we reconcile this to find the true nature of Christ’s calling? How do we look past the inherent ambiguity of this teaching, seeming so inconsistent with all that we have learned otherwise sitting at the feet of our Redeemer?

When Scripture speaks of the believer, it speaks of a person who is free of the yokes and the burdens of this world, telling us where the Spirit is, there is the truest of liberties. (2 Corinthians 3:17) Freedom, in its most basic sense, in its most fundamental of forms, does not and cannot exist in any form of hatred. Hatred is a chain that, when placed around our neck, strangles the life from us as surely as it kills faith itself. The healing that we have been called to is no longer possible, because, in the weakness that it brings, we have forsaken all that was meant to preserve sacred and strengthen life.

At the core of Christ’s teaching is not hatred, nor could it be if he truly is God, as we know him to be. God is, after all, love (1 John 4:8) and love itself is what is at the heart of the matter.

The two greatest commandments that fulfill all aspects of the law are that we love the Lord our God with all of our hearts, and souls and minds, and that we love our neighbors as we love ourselves. (Matthew 22:36:40) Yet, even as we consider that teaching we must remember that Christ did not put these on equal footing. The first was to love the Lord, while the second was to love others. At the heart of the matter is that if we are to be faithful to God, if we are to truly follow Him with our whole heart, willing to be led as He would lead us then we can love nothing more than we love Him. Even in the context of the original Greek this is the meaning that lies behind the use of “Hate”, not as we so often think about it, but rather in terms of loving less.

Discipleship means that we must be willing to sacrifice. In love, it means a willingness to give everything and anything in love and hope for others. (John 15:14) When we love God, when we love Christ more than we love anything else, we are willing to give up what is necessary to serve our risen Savior in the hope, the faith, the strength, and the love he first taught us. (John 13:34-35) It means we are willing to offer all of who we are in healing as we find ourselves able to let go and let God lead us.

Perhaps this may be a burden for us, a cross that we must take up and carry. But, in a sense it is a trade, for when we trust God, when we look to Him, holding Him first, we cast the heavier burdens of this world, the self-doubt, the uncertainty for the future, the hurt of lose and the pain of longing far from us, and we take upon us the yoke of service that shines in hope, and dwells in a faith and a knowledge that though we may be affected by the course of this world, nothing will affect us much as it teaches us the value and the worth that truly rests in His creation and His plan.

As you are called to be a Disciple of Christ, God will never ask more of you than you can give, more of you than you can offer. Understanding that we must be willing to lay all of ourselves on the altar of God as a sacrifice, knowing that, as much is given to us in the grandness of His design much will be asked of us. Yet that price of discipleship should be one we are always willing to pay.

Do good

True Christianity

Romans 12:10  Love one another with brotherly affection. Outdo one another in showing honor.

Have you ever been part of a church that just didn’t feel like it was really living out the purposes of God?  When that happens it often starts with a lack in the love department.  If Christians can’t love each other, the fellow members of the body of Christ, then there will be no effective ministry.

Paul’s marks of a true Christian reflect not just how a Christian should act, but how Christians should treat each other.  These were not instructions on how to treat people “out there”, but how to treat people “in here” first.  Practicing the love of God and doing good works starts among family and then it spills out into the rest of our relationships.  We must first love and serve our fellow believers.

This is one of the key reasons to belong to a local church fellowship.  A church provides the opportunity to love and serve those who share a faith in Christ before going out and doing it among the people of the world.  A church is a place to be equipped for ministry, and that starts with love and service from and toward your fellow Christians.  Besides that, Christian unity is best perfected within the context of a gathering of believers who make up a family.

Love what is good, hate what is evil, love and serve your Christian brothers and sisters.

Serve God

A disciple

Mark 25:44-45 Then they also will answer, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not minister to you?’  Then he will answer them, saying, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’

It sounds like it should go without saying, but a disciple serves God.  Why does this even need to be mentioned?  Shouldn’t all Christians by default be servants of God?  Well, yes, but the reality is that many who are saved are not servants.  Many are more interested in being served than in serving.  But that’s not the example Jesus gave us.

Jesus came to serve, not to be served (Mark 10:45).  If anyone ever deserved to be treated like royalty, never having to lift a finger, it was Jesus.  The God Man could have had a throne and a kingdom right here on earth.  But instead He spent His time here serving others, even to the point of giving His own life.  This is our example, not one of entitlement and expectation, but of humility and hard work.

We may get so caught up in living life that we think we have no time to serve God, but the truth is we can be honoring Him in all that we do, even at work or at school.  We can serve any and all people around us, even in simple ways, and this is indirectly serving our Lord.  But loving others, we show love to the One who made them.  And we point them to Him in the process.