Tag Archives: strength

Find Strength

Philippians 4:13 I can do all things through him who strengthens me.

No matter where you find yourself, you’re not too far away for God to find you.  No matter what your circumstances, He can walk you through.  He is good, and you can trust Him in good times and bad times.

As followers of Christ, we would benefit from following the example of Paul, learning how to be content in all situations.  A heart that’s truly fixed on God will not let events determine faith.  Focus on the nature of God and know that no matter what, no matter how good or how bad, you can trust Him.

You can do all things through Him who strengthens you.  Pray in all things and rely on Him to provide.  He is more than able to be your everything.

———-  Where are you trying to find your strength?  Is it in God or in the things of this world that don’t live up to their promises?

You’re weak, God’s strong

IS4078RF-00009656-001Isaiah 40:29-31 He gives power to the faint, and to him who has no might he increases strength. Even youths shall faint and be weary, and young men shall fall exhausted; but they who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint.

One thing I find very sad about the state of the American church culture is that many Christians don’t feel like they can be real about their struggles. Because of the facade we think we have to put on for other church people, we don’t let them in on our little secret that we’re weak and it’s only because of God’s strength that we make it.

It does a disservice to everyone when we think we have to be strong on our own. I remember thinking as a kid that all of the Christians I saw at church had it all together. I really never knew that anyone had doubts about their faith, or worried about their finances, or had marriage issues. I just thought that I was supposed to have it made if I was a Christian. I know better now.

It’s not only okay to be reliant on God for His strength, it’s what He wants from us. He even allows us at times to be in circumstances that only He can get us out of. Why? So He can display His strength. Being dependent on God is right and good. He’s our Father who wants to take care of us and He is able to do so.

Sometimes we have to put down the Hercules act and admit that we’re not superhuman. To be physically healthy we need rest and we need to know our limitations. We need to trust in God enough to take care of things that we pause from working and let Him handle it. Believe it or not, this also leads to spiritual growth also.

How are you doing at this? Do you think you have to handle everything or do you rely on God and rest in Him?

Our refuge

Psalm 18:2 The Lord is my rock and my fortress and my deliverer, my God, my rock, in whom I take refuge, my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.

Where do you turn when things get tough? Your answer to that question reveals a lot about your faith. Do you put your trust in things that can’t deliver? Do you find comfort from that which cannot guarantee it? There’s only one safe place to turn. God is our refuge.

The very same God who spared Noah’s family from the flood, delivered His people into the promised land, defeated an army using only 300 men, and sent a Savior to earth will be there in your struggles. He’s there fore you in your loss, in your surprising diagnosis, your layoff, or your broken relationship. You can turn to Him when you’re hurt, afraid, worried, depressed, confused, or unsure. He’s been there. He understands your needs, frustrations, and heart-felt desires.

Your heavenly Father can deliver on anything because He owns it all. Most of all, He can provide comfort. That other stuff – money, therapy, alcohol – none of them make a good refuges in which to take shelter. Only in the arms of your loving Father can you truly be safe and secure. He loves you, He cares for you, and He’s available anytime you need Him.

Grace for the weary

Philippians 1:6 And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ.

Ministry is wearisome. Recently I heard a sermon by Pastor Mark Driscoll in which he said “You should never grow weary of ministry, but ministry will make you weary.” For everyone who has ever participated in ministry, and if you are a Christian this means you, you know how draining it can be. It can push you physically and emotionally to the edge. It’s at these times that we need God’s grace the most, where we need Jesus to be strong in our weakness. And it’s ok to be made weary by doing ministry. We make ourselves weary for many other things in our day to day lives, how much more should we be made weary for things that have eternal consequences?

What’s not ok is when we become weary of doing ministry. Those days when we call it in, when do things half way, and when we just throw in the towel. In almost every church, and in so many Christians lives, there will be a point where one of us will become discouraged. We lose sight of the prize and no longer look at the future. We take our eyes off of Jesus and forget the grace that was afforded us on the cross. What do we do with brothers and sisters who have fallen in this way?

We pick them back up. Jesus said in John 13:34 “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you.” The church in Phillipi was going through some difficulties and some of the leaders were losing their focus. Paul didn’t open his letter to the Phillipians scolding them or telling them they better get their act together or else. Instead, he opens it with nothing but encouragement and love. Most importantly he took them back to the place where they started, where we all started. That place is the cross.

We need the cross not just when we fall on our face, but everyday and in all that we do. And when we don’t start at the cross, when we rely on our own strength, when we take on the weight of ministry by ourselves, we are doomed to fail. When one of us falls, we need to remind them of one simple fact. The battles may not be over but the war is won. Jesus is victorious. We are redeemed by the grace of Jesus Christ and everything else we do in this life is simply to bring God glory. In other words, everything else we do is just icing on the beautiful and perfect cake that Jesus has given us.

Those of us who are partners in the gospel need to love each other. We need to encourage one another. We need to remind each other of all the ways that Jesus has worked in and through our lives. And when one of us falls down, too tired to continue. We need to pick them up with grace. The grace of Jesus Christ, grace for the weary.

Who, or What, Can be Against Us


“What, then, shall we say in response to this? If God is for us, who can be against us?” (Romans 8:31) How often do we forget that promise? Perhaps it’s not forget in the traditional sense. After all we remember what the words are, and we may even utter them quietly to ourselves, searching for some sort of comfort when things start to get tough, but, when we look around, we have a hard time really and truly grasping not necessarily what it means but how it applies to our current situations. After all, if God is for us, should it really be this hard? Can’t it just be that much easier? Why can’t it be that much simpler than it is?

That’s the struggle though, isn’t it? It doesn’t come from God’s promises but from seeing how it is actually working in our lives. The words, they aren’t all that hard to understand, but how they apply, how they can possibly be true, that’s the real difficulty that we face. “If God is for us, who can be against us?” At times it just seems like pretty much everyone or everything and the burden, it is too much to bear as we search for the purpose and meaning in it all, as we seek the answers to why it has to be the way it is when the we know God is there, but we can’t figure out how He is there.

We’re not the first to face that question. What were the words of the Elisha as the army’s surrounded the city and it seemed as if all had been lost? “‘Don’t be afraid,” the prophet answered. “Those who are with us are more than those who are with them.’” (2 Kings 6:16) In many senses we can all be like the servant who cried out, seeing the insurmountable odds, “Oh no! My Lord, what shall we do?” (2 Kings 6:15) We don’t necessarily see the army of the living God, standing there in front of us, we don’t necessarily see the miracle of His power and glory between us and our real struggle, our real adversity, because we are so focused on all the ways everything has or can go bad, on all the ways that it has or can go wrong. Yet, what we need to be focused on is faith. After all, if it is truly what is hoped for and yet unseen (Hebrews 11:1) then our salvation and our defense is truly at hand even when it is the least clear to us.

We are reminded by the words of the Psalmist, “The LORD is with me; I will not be afraid. What can mere mortals do to me?” (Psalm 118:6) More aptly we should be remember it is not just “What can mere mortals do to me?”, it is also a question of “What can this mere mortal world do to me?” No matter how many times it seems like it is there to knock us down, no matter how many times it may seem like it is there to break us, no matter how often the Devil may come to us, roaring like a lion that is seeking to devour (1 Peter 5:8) God is there to heal us, to strengthen us in the love afforded to us by His goodness and mercy. (Psalm 147:3) After all, if He so loved each us, if He so loved the world that He would not even withhold His precious son from us, (John 3:16) letting his precious blood be spilled for us and for our sins then what really will He let touch us, what really will He let destroy us.

Each step of the way, in all that we are and all that we face, God really is there to stand for us. Sometimes it just takes letting go of the things that we think we know, remembering God’s wisdom and understanding surpasses even our own, and letting His invisible hand take hold of us, rising from the places we cannot see to stretch over us to protect us, to ensure that nothing that really and truly can rob us of His peace and comfort if we trust in Him will overtake us. Yes, that is a hard leap of faith to sometimes make when everything seems to be going against us, but then it is a question of how much hope do you truly put in the Lord and do you trust the promises He offers unto you as an undeniable truth for your life.

Take a moment in your day today, look at the struggles and the challenges that are weighing on you. Close your eyes, and search for God’s love for your life. It is there, and it is ready to make you more powerful than you ever thought possible if you just let it. No matter what hardship or difficulty life may offer, they fall if you stand firm in the Lord. It just takes the strength and the power He has already given to you and that you perhaps aren’t yet aware that you have. Then will you rest easy in the blessings of His promises for you.

What if God Doesn’t Care

Sometimes it’s hard not to wonder if God actually even cares.

I mean we know He does, or, at the very least, we think He does. It tells us in Scripture He does, and what are the words to that children’s song? “Jesus loves me, this I know, because the Bible tells me so.” After all, if He cared enough to create us, if He made the promises that He made, assuring us that they are the same, that His love, bound to us through Christ, is the same yesterday, today and forever (Hebrews 13:8) there has to be something to the idea that He actually cares. Yet, sometimes it feels more complicated than that, does it? Sure it’s the faith of a child that saves, making way the path to Heaven, (Luke 18:17) but we don’t stay children forever, eventually we put away childish things (1 Corinthians 13:11) and adult problems follow us.

During those times God can seem so far distant, He can seem so far removed as we pray for a sign, for any sign that He still sees us, that He still contends with our cause, that He still cares. There are those times when, for as much as we know that He is there, we just don’t seem to feel it, at least not like we did, at least not like we should, and it’s hard. More than anything else it hurts as we just want so badly for Him to make His presence to be known, to let us know He’s still there, that He still sees us. If there is a Hell, if it is being removed from the presence of God, then those moments sure seem like they are as close as you can get to it on earth, aren’t they?

The thing about it is that, whether we feel His presence or not, whether we see His hand or not, God is there, and there isn’t a moment, a second, an instant where He doesn’t care. (Matthew 6:25-34) We know this not just because the Bible tells us that He loves us, that He is always there for us, that He cares for each of us individually with hope and grace, mercy and faith, but because He is the God who gave His only Son as the great sacrifice to wash away our sin and our guilt, to chase away all those problems big and small that would keep us separated from Him. (John 3:16)

You see, this temporal existence is the last great battlefield, and the Devil, our old adversary, he does everything he can to prove to us that Hell does exist, not just as a spiritual plane but as physical one too, and that this, right here is it. After all, if he can convince us that God doesn’t see us here, if He doesn’t see our pain and our anguish here, then is there really a God, is there really a Heaven or a Hell beyond any of this or is it just a moral argument devised millennia ago? After all, for as much as it can be made to feel as much like Hell as it can, our existence this side of Paradise can’t really be made to feel as splendid as Heaven itself, for however close we may wish or want it to be.

It’s not that God doesn’t care, or that He doesn’t understand. It’s that it’s easier for us to believe that He doesn’t see it than it is for us to accept the truth: amidst this life there are going to be struggles and hardships that seem like they are more than we can handle, there are going to be things in it that are going to cause us so much pain we don’t necessarily know what to do, and yes, God doesn’t necessarily stop them from happening. Why? Because even through them He has a plan for them, He has a lesson He teaches us (Jeremiah 29:11) and He knows nothing the Devil can throw at us is more powerful than we are when we put our hope, our faith and our trust in Him. (1 Corinthians 10:13) Just because we know something is painful now doesn’t mean it can’t lead to something amazing in our future now if we let God show us what it means, just like we can’t know if God takes something painful from us now it can’t lead to a greater pain or a deeper anguish in the future. The nature of faith has to be in the trust, as we put everything we don’t know in the hands of a God who does.

Never for a moment believe that God doesn’t care. He does, and, even in your hardship He is sparing you from some greater challenge, some greater hardship, waging a perpetual battle against sin, death and the Devil for you. He is doing it in ways we can’t understand and can’t conceive, and all He asks of you is a little bit of faith as He guides you through it all. It’s here then that we realize that when we can’t see God or hear Him we need to rely on our other senses, on a greater spiritual sense to find Him. When we do, we know then not only does He care for us, but that He also carries us. It’s then that though that purpose may be lost on us for the moment, we are drawn to the greater moments nearer to eternity when all purpose is revealed to us.

Lessons of Faith (Two): Patience


As we are instructed through faith, so we ought to live. After all, there is no lesson in our lives that that can’t be taught to us if we take the time to understand the deeper meaning that the gift of grace that has been given to us through the power of the Spirit and the hold that it has on each of us.

It begins with trust, a trust that comes through letting go and letting God lead us. In a sense, it is both simple and yet hard for us to do. After all, when we are called to the new life that comes through the redemption of Christ, we come to put our hope in our Heavenly Father through the precious blood of the Lamb. Yet, for as much as we may rest on that blessed eternity, it’s the hardest thing for us to let go of our daily lives as we find ourselves faced with challenges: toiling, worrying, struggling as we reach towards who we want to be, who we need to be, knowing we have the capacity to do it but finding that it is just out of our reach.

Only when we remember that our God is the Lord of the great and the small, and put it all in His hand — that’s when we realize the fullness of our potential. But then, for as much as we need to trust, it is nothing if we do not heed the second great lesson of faith that comes to bear in our lives and our plans. This is patience.

Patience is perhaps the biggest stumbling block to trust, isn’t it? A fruit of faith, (Galatians 5:22-23) we know, we understand that it’s important, yet it is the difference between the head and the heart. But then life is short, something we are often times so painfully aware of. (Psalm 89:47) We want what we want right now, because we don’t want to waste the preciousness of that wondrous gift God has given us when He breathed life into us.

What we often times forget is that we aren’t always ready, we aren’t always prepared for everything. Like the Prodigal (Luke 11:15-32) we are so eager to go out and see everything, to feel everything. Perhaps our ambitions and our view of the wider world isn’t as selfish or as self centered as his was. It could be that we want it because we know all the good we can do, all the good that is possible for us and from us if we are just given the chance to be more. Yet when we allow for our impatience to take over, we go out unprepared for what the world has to offer and the resistance it may possibly put up against us.

Remember that God not only tells us, but He warns us as well that there is a time for everything (Ecclesiastes 3:1-8) if we are wise enough to be patient in it. God gives to us, He is gracious on to us, and the promise of His love is the same promise He makes over and over to you: He will not fail you or forsake you (Joshua 1:5) as He shows that His time is perfect if we rest it in His hands. (Psalm 31:15) Just because we want it right now doesn’t mean an unchanging God, a God who, in that nature, protects us from all we are not ready or prepared for, (Malachi 3:6) is suddenly going to change.

Faith involves patience just as assuredly as it involves trust. After all, the saints who rested in blessed faith did so patiently waiting for the hour of the Savior’s arrival that the blemishes of their sins might be washed away. They were saved because they looked, and they waited to the appointed hour of God’s anointed one. Even now, in faith, we wait for the second coming of that same Savior that will usher in the final hours of the Lord. If we can wait patiently, if we can look towards these things, trusting in God as we do, knowing the greater importance that they have in our lives, for our spirits and our souls, then why can’t we let go and be patient with Him, trusting in the promises that He has made to us?

Your time and your hour is coming if you just realize it is going to happen when God is ready for it to happen, Then the fullness of His design, the wonders of His plan will be revealed to you in the most significant of ways. He isn’t going to leave you without enough time to do what He intends for you to do even if time is short and our days our numbered. It’s just a matter of having faith in that, learning what it is that He is trying to teach you so you can be who you need to be. When that does happen you will see your faith is rewarded in the most significant of blessings and the most wondrous of miracles.

Be strong, dear disciples; be strong and be courageous, but most importantly be patient. Your hour is near. Just let God show it to you.

Lessons of Faith (One): Trust


The greatest lessons we can learn come from the deeper meaning that faith has in our lives. As we are it teaches us as we ought to be, as we desire to be, so it instructs us as we need to be. The only questions that then remain are what does God require of us so we can live up to His potential and what gifts has He given us so we can?

In the stress of life’s journey we sometimes forget that, don’t we? It’s hard to keep focus on, especially in our times of trouble and hardship we pray for our Heavenly Father to reveal His plan for us as we battle with our deeper sense of purpose and meaning. It’s not for lack of trying, it’s just that we can’t see it when the times get rough and the world around us seems slightly blurred. We want to do more, to be more but we can’t entirely see how we are supposed to do it. We look for the answers but, in the end, they seem far removed and far distant from us as we do.

The thing about it is that it’s never quite as complicated as we make it. Granted none of us can see the future, and we don’t know what’s going to happen next in our lives. God, on the other hand does, and He has a purpose in it. (Isaiah 46:10) For everything we can’t see, and that we can’t understand or yet comprehend, the Lord, our God, can and does and in this, He creates, through us, something of the divine with miraculous wonder. (Romans 8:29) Perhaps we may not always fully grasp what that is or what that means but it doesn’t make His presence any less amazing and wonderful as He guides us according to His amazing plan.

It’s here that we must come to realize that the first and the foremost lesson of faith is a lesson of trust.

On a grander scale we perhaps already know that. After all, we are saved by grace through faith and not of our works. (Ephesians 2:8-9) Understanding that our blessed Savior is the way, the truth and the light, we know we come to God through Him, (John 14:6) washed clean through His precious blood. (Isaiah 1:18) We trust God, we trust His plan with the most important parts of ourselves, with the greatest portion of our being, our hearts and our souls and our spirits. Yet, we still find it hard to let go of the smaller things, and why? Maybe because, though that gift of grace transforms us, it deals with all that is unseen, with all that we don’t necessarily confront on a day to day basis. The smaller things, they wage there own little wars on us day by day, moment by moment, chipping away at us, taking more and more from us to the point were we suddenly think that we have to take it all into our hands.

The truth is, until we learn to let go of the small, until we learn to let go of the daily troubles we have, putting them into God’s hands as we leave the burdens we have at the feet of Christ, whatever they may be, (Matthew 11:28-30) there is no rest, there is no peace for us, just worries and struggles that seem to overwhelm and overpower us. Simply put, trust in God is letting go and letting Him lead. It is realizing there are things that we cannot and will not ever be able to change, so, instead of spending our time worrying about them, we need to let Him worry about them for us as we travel down the path of our life. It’s a matter of finally allowing yourself the comfort of knowing that the God of the large is the God of the small, and He is going to care for you regardless of what you may be facing. (Matthew 6:25-34)

Yes, it may be that God is going to lead you to make some hard choices and perhaps some tough decisions, He is perhaps going to tell you that the road you are going to have to travel down isn’t going to be easy. Yet, in that first lesson of faith comes the realization that every challenge you face is not a challenge that you and you alone have faced, that only you have known. God has seen it all through the lives of His saints and He has provided a way forward so they have been able to reach the promises through the hope He offers. (1 Corinthians 10:13) Just remember, He is going to take you down a path, when you put You trust in Him, that you might not have thought of, that might make you question but that is ultimately going to work wonders through you.

So what are you holding on to? What is it that you are continuing to hold on to? Release it. Release it to God and take His hand, it is reaching out to you. Whatever you think or whatever you feel like you know or don’t know, give it over to God. He is there to take it from you. Sure, God can work with you even if you refuse to let go and let Him lead, but it’s just going to end up creating a lot more hardship and pain as you wrestle not just with your problems or with your plans, but with Him too.

Find strength in faith, find strength in trust, for when you do a whole new world will be opened to you in ways you little thought possible in the wonders of God’s plan that works through the great and the small. Then, with that lesson, will you take the first steps towards learning what you need to know at the Masters feet as He directs you in the wonders of His love for you.

A Question of Why

Why? Isn’t that always the question? Often times it’s the one short little three letter word that defines for us our trials and adversity, our struggles and our pain. We ask it as we try to make some sort of semblance of sense out of everything we can’t figure out enough to actually make sense. We do it to the point where it’s not just a question anymore, but the answer as well.

How often have we found ourselves challenged, asking ‘Why’? “Why me?” “Why now?” “Why do bad things happen to good people?” “If God is so good and He loves us, they why would He let this happen?” At times, it’s the easiest and quickest word to roll off of our tongues in our hour of need, knowing we just don’t know and that what we need to know isn’t going to come simply or readily to us even for as much as we want it to.

But then life is difficult, it’s hard and it’s wrought with challenges. Just when we think we’ve gotten our head wrapped around it enough to actually do something, it throws a curve ball that knocks us off our game. Sometimes it’s small, and we’re able to pick ourselves up and dust ourselves off saying “Nothing ventured, nothing gained” as we move on from it. Other times it’s big and it’s encompassing and, for as much as we want it to, we can’t quite seem to do it, we can’t quite figure it out enough to do it. It leaves us with this hurt feeling as we wonder if it’s ever going to be the same. In those moments, “Why” is about the only thing that’s uncomplicated about the complicated to us.

The thing is it’s not always about the “Why”. After all, for as unclear as it may all be, for as convoluted as it perhaps seems to be, the “Why” is actually transparent, it’s not that complex at all. We live in a sinful world; one that, since the fall of man, has been marked with trials and temptations. (Genesis 3:1-19) As Peter reminds us, “Be self-controlled and alert. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.” (1 Peter 5:8) Is there a greater “Why” than this?

Even the most righteous, the most faithful, living in this mortal realm, need fear the old adversary, and they need to do so more than the unrighteous. After all, the greater question of “Why” is why would the Devil go after a soul he already has when the nature of man is to abide in fear and doubt? He knows this, and he doesn’t go after the weak alone, but the strong, hunting them, seeking to make them his own.

No, the question isn’t “Why?” regardless of how easy it comes. “Why” is often times the means by which uncertainty attacks that which we need to be the most certain of. “Why” is the easiest way to make the simple become complex, so complex that we can’t begin to understand it. “Why”, for as hard as it may be to let go of, is how comfort and peace is robbed from us as it sends us looking everywhere but where we need to for the answers.

It’s not “Why” that’s the most important thing, but rather “What” and “How”. “What am I supposed to learn?” “How is this going to make me a better person?” “What can I do differently?” “How can I use this to grow in faith and better understand God’s plan for me?” Regardless of the pain and the hardships we may face, these are the questions we not only have to ask but the ones that need to draw us closer and nearer to our Heavenly Father.

The promise of God is the promise that where we are so He is as well. He will never fail us or forsake us. (Joshua 1:5) His covenant with us is the covenant that stands by His blessed assurances to us in the faithfulness of His love and mercy. (Deuteronomy 4:31) So strong is He in that love and care He has for us, in the covenant He has made with us, He would give His only Son to die for us (John 3:16) even when we seemed like we were lost to sin, death and the Devil. How much more then does the wonders of His Word mean when He tells to us that, if we come to Him, in faith and hope, He will give us the knowledge that we so seek? (James 1:5-6)

Even when we stumble, even when we fall, even when the world seems unfair, unnecessarily so, our blessed Savior is there for us, to take the yoke of our burdens from us. (Matthew 11:28-30) Again, the “Why” is simple, it’s a matter then of “What are we meant to do with the freedom He has given us?” and “How can we use His good gifts to be the people He has intended for us to be?” We can only do that, we can only answer that by letting go of “Why”, understanding that it has already been answered for us, and we are not in control of it, all we can control is what we do with the blessed gifts and the wonderful promises God has given to us.

It’s only then that we can find the peace, the hope, and the comfort we so long for.

Miracles Great and Small

How often, in our times of trouble, do we pray for a miracle? In our faith and our hope we often just find ourselves kneeling down, laying it all out and wishing for something, for anything that will come, wanting it so badly and for it to be enough to encompass our lives, making it just that much easier.

Why not? After all, even in his sin, even in his fallen state of anger and hate, Saul of Taurus gave witness to a miracle. The ground rumbled, and shook and any questions, any doubt he had was chased away by the booming voice of God as the heavens split and His presence and will was made known to him. He didn’t even pray, he wasn’t working in faith, the persecutor of the early Church he didn’t even realize he was in need of that divine guidance, yet there it was. So why can’t we be blinded by the glory of God to be shown the path? Why can’t His voice come like thunder from the skies to tell us the road we need to go down?

It’s one of those questions, one of those struggles we battle with. We know the verses, “No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.” (Romans 8:37) or “I can do everything through him who gives me strength.”, (Philippians 4:13) but sometimes it seems as if the God who tells us to be strong and courageous, reminding us that He will never fail us or forsake us (Deuteronomy 31:6) just doesn’t hear. It almost feels as if He is waiting for us to figure it out for ourselves, removed from the situation as we plead with Him, in our faith, for a little more, for a little something, the weight of it all just bearing down on us.

God’s miracles are never far from us though. It’s just a matter of looking for them and seeing them right in front of us. Though He can, He doesn’t necessarily send angels with blazing swords to appear in front of us, nor does He split the skies to appear in His wondrous glory in front of us. Even as we want a dramatic example or an encompassing miracle that shows us the path of His divine design for our lives, it’s not the way it works.

The promise of God isn’t the promise that He will give us what we want. It’s the promise that, in His goodness and His mercy, in His love for us He will give us what we need. (2 Peter 1:3) With that, through the power of His Holy Spirit, His miracles are everywhere around us to behold, made manifest in His hope for us. (Hebrews 2:4) It’s just a matter of understanding what those miracles truly are, letting your heart and your soul, your spirit and your mind open to the fruits of His Spirit, (Galatians 5:22-23) the truest blessings of God’s wondrous plan and love for us.

Coming to our Heavenly Father, laying our burdens at the feet of Christ, means not only trust Him, it means not only having faith in Him, it means opening our eyes to the great and to the small, knowing that they happen all around us if we are truly receptive to the way that they come to us. With that it’s not about the lessons He can teach us or the hope He can give us when He makes things so easy for us that we can’t ignore it, it’s about the way He guides us to a better understanding, a greater understanding that only comes when we open our eyes to a world of greater possibilities through Him. It’s the reminder that, as our blessed Savior reminds us, it takes but a mustard seed of faith to move a mountain, (Matthew 17:20) and the greatest came come from the smallest.

Though He promises us His goodness, His hope and His mercy, telling us that He has plans for us and for our lives, (Jeremiah 29:11) God comes to us on His terms, not on ours. He does so because, better than we know ourselves, He knows us and what is best for us. With that He guides us and leads us according to who we are and who we need to be, we just need to keep our eyes and our hearts open to the signs and the wonders that He has all around us. Perhaps they’re not always easy to see, but they are there. What we need to remember is that coming to God in faith, coming to Christ in hope, trusting in their blessings, and their guarantees, means we are trusting in the power and the terms of the Divine, and not just our own want or desire for what that should mean.

Let your hearts behold the miracles of the living God, let your lives be encompassed by those blessings great and small. Let go of your own preconceived notions of what they should be or need to be. Once you do, you open yourself up to a whole new world of possibilities where the miracles you once considered small now become greater than anything you ever imagined as they give you the power to do more and be more according to the wonders of God through the grace of Christ in the power of the Holy Spirit.